film and photo scanner

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DJDrDamage
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film and photo scanner

Postby DJDrDamage » Fri Jan 25, 2013 2:33 pm

in the market for a new film and photo scanner.
I have some photos to scan and C mainly has film negatives.

in terms of quantities:

- photos = about 50
- negatives = between 1000 and 3000 (depending how many we want to do...)

we are looking at the folowing:
- Plustek OptiFilm 8100 for the film negatives
- Epson V700 to do both negatives and photos

time to scan seems to be higher for the Plustek (slightly higher resolution) and need to manually scan each negative, whereas the V700 allows up to 24 negatives in one go, although still long scan times but seems less manual.


recommendations, comments?
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Mort
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Re: film and photo scanner

Postby Mort » Fri Jan 25, 2013 6:54 pm

Geez, you're putting forward two completely different devices at vastly different prices...

Devices like the Plustek actually work by taking a "photo" rather than a scan. They have a small CMOS sensor with a fixed focus lens that takes a snapshot of whatever you want. They are much quicker than proper flatbed scanners, but usually have their own memory (or can add a card) so you don't need a PC connected to scan. That's handy so you can just sit in the loungeroom doing it while watching TV. Not sure about that plustek, but while they do only "scan" one negative at a time, it's very quick and you just click the carriage across for the next one. You can get ones that auto-load, but they tend to be a lot more expensive.

The Epson is great if you are also after a flatbed scanner for other purposes. While it's great that it has a 24 frame negative scanner, you will find that most of your time is actually spent mounting the negative, not scanning them. If you go that path then get another holder so you can load it up while the other one is being scanned. You could easily spend a lot less for a flatbed that will scan slides/negative just fine. If you want to spend $1000, then it might also be worthwhile seeing how much it costs to get a photo lab to do it for you.

As for resolution, don't get too hung up on that, pretty much anything will be high enough res for your purposes. The flatbed will give you better quality in general, all the higher resolutions do is show the film/paper grain more clearly. Don't focus too much on the resolution, focus more on the colour reproduction and image quality itself.

I got my grandmother one of these to scan her slides
http://www.officeworks.com.au/retail/pr ... rs/BCPS989
It works well enough, build quality isn't brilliant, but it does everything it says it does. The slides she's scanning are so old that it doesn't matter how much you spend on a scanner, you can't improve the quality anyway. If you want to make them better then it is easier to do it post-scannig on your PC.
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DJDrDamage
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Re: film and photo scanner

Postby DJDrDamage » Sat Jan 26, 2013 7:52 am

thanks for your detailed post.they are quite different bits of kit but we have a mixed bag of originals.
The Plustek has a CCD and LED, acting like a scanner, rather than the Qpix, which is more like a digital camera.

i saw the QPix but was put off by some reports that it did not capture the entire frame. did you find that that was a problem with your grandmother's slides? if not, maybe this is the way to go. it is a lot cheaper...
i liked that it works independently of a PC...very handy...


generally, the plustek gets good reviews and was not too expensive. most of C's photos are from her trekking and other trips so we want to ensure we can get as good as possible given the age of the negatives, and things like sharpness, clarity and color depth seem to be good on the Plustek.

At higher resolutions, and i understand that the resolutions quoted are marketing (i found a good review site that determines effective reoslutions, which was interesting) the plustek is said to take between 5-10 minutes to scan, which would be labour intensive. although, in nearly all cases we would not need higher resolutions (so quicker scans) as we would not be printing at larger than 6x4 if at all. this exercise is to capture for posterity. in teh case of the V700, with all 24 slots filled it apparently takes a long time, as well (about an hour or more).

your comments about the flatbed giving better results in general is interesting. i have no experience in this area, and get the info from forums, and most forum posts say they are very happy with both Plustek and V700 (as examples) but that the plustek's results are better for film negatives. this may be because of the mount rather than the sanner, however.


cheers
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DJDrDamage
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Re: film and photo scanner

Postby DJDrDamage » Sat Jan 26, 2013 8:21 am

just spoke with C about the QPix. she seems happy to buy the Qpix if it does not crop the image and for $159 seems like good value.

as for scanning photos- i can look for a flatbed with a smaller form factor than the V700 and that is less expensive.
most of those photos are very old, B&W or sepia from my grandfather's days in the canefields, so anything will be good enough for that...


thanks.
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Re: film and photo scanner

Postby Mort » Sat Jan 26, 2013 8:36 am

At first I thought the qpix was cropping, but then I realised I was putting the slide 90' the wrong way. It might crop a very small strip down the side, but not that I actually noticed.
Keep in mind it is a very cheap piece if hardware for what it does, so don't get disappointed if it doesn't look like it was designed by Apple 😉
The qpix will also scan photos, just lift the lid and slide the switch to change the mode.
Flatbed scanners tend to have better calibration, and no potential lens effect or corner distortions that might be a result from the macro lens style qpix. I suppose all I can suggest is try it out, and if you don't like it officeworks has a good return policy from memory.

In the end it all depends on how much you really want to spend on this, both in money and time.
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Re: film and photo scanner

Postby DJDrDamage » Sun Jan 27, 2013 7:02 am

thanks for the extra feedback. i did not realise it scanned photos, as well. given Officeworks' return policy it may be worth a trial run this week.

Our Returns Policy
If any product you purchase from us is faulty, damaged (through no fault of your own), not fit for its usual purpose, or you have simply changed your mind we will gladly exchange it, refund it or can arrange for it to be repaired subject to the specific points below.
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